Nurturing an Artist in Your Kiddie

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We parents simply can’t get enough of dreaming for our kiddies. I sometimes look at my child asleep, wondering whether he’ll be an astronaut or scientist until I stop and smile at the wildness of my imaginations. While I know it isn’t for me to decide, I want to make sure that I do my part well as a parent for now. As much as I can, I want to support my child and do my best to mold him into the person fit for his dream. I’ll start by nurturing the artist in my kiddie.

I believe all hobby, interest, and profession are rooted in the love of the arts. Success in anything requires creativity, right? A recent study in addition, has confirmed that art makes people smart after observing significant improvement among some student participants they brought to a museum. The students have showed impressive measures of tolerance, historical empathy, and sustained interest in culture even after finishing the essays required of them.

If you want to nurture an artist in your kiddie and contribute to their colorful future, follow these tips:

Develop imaginations by asking questions

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Ask your kiddie some questions that start with “what if” and “I wonder”, such as “What if I pull the other end of this rope while it’s tied to the shelf?” and “I wonder what color we’ll produce with blue and yellow?” Experts say these questions push kiddies to use imagination as they think of a creative but at the same time (somehow) logical answer. It also sparks their interest in problem solving, teaches them to explore alternatives, and consider options.

You can ask these questions after bringing your kiddie to a museum or anywhere related to art. While standing in front of a painting ask, “I wonder what the artist was thinking when he made this” or “What if you can replace the sun as the subject, what would you choose?”

Provide encouraging materials

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What your kiddies need mostly are tools for experimentation and exploration. Don’t throw away materials your children may use like cardboard box, which is great for play, performance, and imagination. After this when your kiddie starts showing you what they made out of the box, don’t forget to value their effort, ask them to explain the artwork, and compliment.

Other than cardboard boxes and other art materials, you can also give your child a kiddie tablet especially designed to cater to their age. There are many devices available in the market, but choose one preloaded with apps that let kiddies doodle and easily draw, erase, and color images. In this way, you help nurture an artist in your child who can also keep up with the modern technologies today. 

Encourage positive values

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Nurturing an artist in your kiddie is the also one of the best times to teach them about positive values. Surely, you want your child to grow into a disciplined artist, right? Encourage hard work, perseverance, as you help your kiddie get up from a downfall. Help them learn from mistakes by asking “What didn’t work?‘, inspire them never to give up, continue taking risks, and just work on improving in their craft. 

Know when to let them be

Your role is to provide support, but this doesn’t include deciding every hour of your kiddie’s schedule. Don’t crowd their daily task list with organized activities out of wanting to nurture their creativity, as this is improper and unnatural. Give your kiddie time to be alone, freedom to daydream, and to study life on their own – along your boundaries, of course. 

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We all want to have a little musician, dancer, actor, filmmaker, or artist like Pablo Picasso, but we can only get as far as providing parental support and experimental tools. We can never decide how it’s exactly going to be for our kiddies. Just allow it to happen, parents! Follow the tips mentioned above to awake the artist in your child, and give them freedom to be whoever they dream to be.

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