Building a Closer Relationship with your Child Using Technology

post coverTime spent with your children is time very well spent. It’s so easy to get caught up in the daily grind that children sometimes take the back burner. But children grow up quickly and the opportunity to build strong relationships once missed may never be recovered. Tossing the ball around in the backyard or strolling in the park are good ways to start conversations but nowadays, parents are also encouraged to enter into the world where their children are increasingly spending more and more time – in front of the screen. Here are six ways you can build memories that will last your child through his lifetime using technology: Continue reading

Advertisements

Six Myths About Technology’s Impact on Children

cover image

Parents and educators tend to have a lot of questions and differing opinions when it comes to exposing children to computers and gadgets. They find it hard to determine what is best, especially since these products were not around when they were growing up. Media has covered and presented several advantages and disadvantages of children being exposed to different technologies, but there is little evidence to go on. In its absence, a number of widespread myths about children and technology have emerged:

1. More active screen time will lessen physical activity.image 1

Cutting back kids’ time watching TV and playing video games may not encourage them to spend more of the day running around outside. A study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on just over 1,200 U.S. children, aged six to 11 showed no clear connection between physical activity and active screen time. Tala Fakhouri, the study lead author for CDC said, “I don’t think it’s as simple as, if a child is not watching television, then by default that child will be physically active.” Obesity was once tied both to not getting enough exercise and to spending too much time in front of TV and computer screens, but researchers said the new study backs up earlier findings showing too much screen time and not enough exercise may be separate issues that parents and schools need to address independently.

Continue reading